York Racecourse, Knavesmire

York’s Knavesmire is one of the premier horse racing tracks in Europe and has recently been awarded the honour of the Flat Racecourse of the Year. The course also came out the leader in The Times’ survey of Britain’s racecourses. Knavesmire is one of the city’s focal points attracting over 250,000 visitors each year and bringing…

The Siege of York

With England in the grip of the First Civil War, York was targeted as the Royalists’ northern capital and the seat of the Council of the North. In December 1642 York became the centre of operations for Royalist forces in the north, under the command of the Marquis of Newcastle. Yorkshire had now become a…

St Denys, Walmgate – The Unlucky Church

The Church of St Denys, Walmgate, is a Grade I listed building, one of about forty in England dedicated to St Denys, the patron saint of France and of Paris. The church is one of the oldest of York’s city centre churches in terms of surviving fabric which includes some of York’s oldest stained glass,…

Dick Turpin

Dick Turpin, much-romanticised through legend, was in fact an infamous highwayman, murderer and convicted horse-thief. He was tried and executed in York, assuring his place in English history and being forever linked with the city. The Only Way is Essex Richard ‘Dick’ Turpin was born in 1705 in Hempstead, Essex. His father John was an…

Stonegate

A street full of discoveries, Stonegate runs above the main Roman road the Via Praetoria, now several feet below the busy shopping street. The Roman road led from the Basilica, the headquarters of the Roman military, crossing the Ouse to the civilian west bank. An Aid To The Construction Of The Minster Stonegate would have…

Coppergate

Coppergate, an almost hidden find, leads off from a small opening in Nessgate to where York’s modern and popular shopping complex, with high-street names, department stores, boutiques, art galleries and specialist stores buzzes with browsers and buyers, locals and tourists alike, all year round. However, Coppergate has added attractions. Traders Of Jor(vik) The shoppers are…

Mansion House, St Helen’s Square

The Mansion House, in St Helen’s Square is an architectural masterpiece housing an extensive collection of civic regalia and artefacts. Its exceptional and unique collection of silver, works of art and furniture is unmatched by any other regional city.  The Mansion House remains the official residence of the Lord Mayor of York. A Fashionable House…

Ye Olde Starre Inne

Ye Olde Starre Inne, one of York’s most historic pubs, is a Grade II listed building said to date back to 1644, the year of the siege of York by the Roundheads, when it was first licensed.  The inn does have the longest continuous licence of any pub in York, and it claims to be…

Coney Street

Coney Street, is recognised by its large landmark clock that protrudes above the shoppers below. One of York’s main shopping thoroughfares it is as popular today as it ever was. Formerly Known As King Street It is first found on records as early as 1213 when it then went by the name of Cuningstreta, from…

St Martin-le-Grand, Coney Street

Best Recognised By Its Double-Sided Clock The church of St Martin-le-Grand is situated on the south side of Coney Street; it is known simply as St Martin, Coney Street. The church is named after the patron saint of soldiers, St Martin of Tours, whose Feast Day is 11th November, Armistice Day. The church’s title of…

Dean’s Park

Dean’s Park is a green oasis just to the north side of York Minster. It makes an ideal place for relaxing and absorbing the stunning views of the Minster and its Chapter House.  A meeting place, picnic site and a dream angle for photographers – Dean’s Park means many things to many people, tourists and…

The Guildhall

Building of the present Guildhall, situated at the rear of the Mansion House, began in 1445 – the accounts from which are still in existence. The cost of a boatload of stone from the then market town of Cawood (10 shillings and 3 pence) was given to the workmen to buy drink when the foundations…

The Black Swan, Peasholme Green

The Black Swan inn, in Peasholme Green, York, dates from the 15th century and was originally built as a family house for the Bowes family. William Bowes was Sheriff of York in 1417 and Lord Mayor in 1428. Sir Martin Bowes became an esteemed goldsmith in the City of London during the reign of Henry…

York’s Bridges

The city of York with its two rivers, the Ouse and the Foss, is reliant on its bridge system. The oldest known site, dating to the 9th century, of a bridge spanning the Ouse is that of the current Ouse Bridge (built 1821). In 1154 the original bridge collapsed with a large crowd on it,…

Bar Convent

The Bar Convent in Blossom Street, York, is home to the Congregation of Jesus Community, founded by Mary Ward, whose Sisters have been serving the City of York for over 300 years. Their aims are to engage with people to encourage spiritual growth, education and provision of hospitality. Now Containing A Museum, Shop And Cafe…

Barley Hall

  York’s Barley Hall, a splendid medieval house and a Grade II listed building, was, until 1987, concealed beneath a comparatively modern frontage of a neglected office block. Amazingly the stunning medieval building was discovered prior to the demolition of the office block and its history uncovered. The Hall was built in 1360 as the…

The Chocolate City

One of York’s claims to fame is its illustrious chocolate connections. The evocative names of Rowntree’s and Terry’s of York are synonymous with the city. Think Smarties, All Gold, Aero, Chocolate Orange and Kit Kat (6 million of which are produced in York every single day), all familiar names from childhood still going strong today.…

The Railway Revolution

19th century York, along with the rest of the UK, was turned around by the onset of the railways. Life changed ever increasingly in line with the rail network’s development; the impact on the population, who had to learn to adapt, was striking. The bustle of stage coaches in York’s narrow streets diminished and the…

Bishopthorpe Palace

  The Official Residence Of The Archbishop Of York Bishopthorpe Palace, the official residence of the Archbishop of York, was originally constructed between 1241 and 1250 by Archbishop Walter de Grey. The Archbishop bought the then village of Thorpe St Andrew (St Andrewthorpe) in 1226, demolishing the old manor house and using some of its…

Castle Howard

Castle Howard, a Baroque Grade I listed building, is one of the most palatial (having 145 rooms) country houses in England and not a castle at all. It is set amidst the beauty of the Howardian Hills and lies 15 miles north of York. The house is home to the Hon. Simon and Mrs Howard…